Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Updates and 30 Days of Equitop Myoplast

It snowed all of this in 12 hours.
We are sitting just past the halfway point into experimenting with Equitop Myoplast as per the Vets recommendations to build topline. While this product is mainly designed for horses in work, it has also been used on horses that are on stall rest (and cannot lose muscle tone), and horses that are just coming back into work. Part of me is interested to see what kind of results I would have had had Annie been in full work - but Daylight savings time and Winter can really put a damper on things.

I've managed to put a few rides on her - none of them schooling other than rides down the road and hacking down the streets. Lunging has been off the table for about a week or so, as the ground became quite slippery and with 3ft of icey snow, I don't want to risk injury for the sake of trotting around in circles.

New purple pad from our ride before the snow flew.
Also note: Spud exiting stage left.
So, we are kind of land-locked. Which, I am kind of OK with. I miss riding with more purpose, but this "let down" period has been pretty beneficial for the both of us. I am rediscovering tho, that Annie is still a baby bean and I need to put more thought into things. For example, we had a farrier appointment last week and I had literally done nothing with the horse for almost two weeks. The wind was blowing, it was cold, and I pulled her out and expected her to stand quiet (not necessarily defending her, but I didn't really put her in the best situation, esp with this being her 3rd time being hot shod). Unfortunately, the disastrous farrier appointment resulted in the farrier only tacking two fronts on her and calling it a day. I didn't blame him and he left with a copious tip. After he left, we revisited the basics and after a few Come To Jesus meetings (and after pulling back on her lead, ugh), she complied and was as sweet as pie.

It's frustrating, but I guess that is just baby horses. We will keep plugging along and I have instilled more variety into our groundwork that hopefully will end up being useful during farrier/vet/chiro appointments and make them more friendly and safer for the professionals dealing with my horse. It isn't fair to expect someone to come and work on a fractious horse, regardless of what is up their ass that day.

Hacking bareback.
We've been able to ride around quite a bit - ponying Spud and even riding around bareback in the snow. It's been fun to have "no pressure" rides, and we've been working on a variety of baby things - like standing quiet in the middle of the road because "OH MY GOD WE HAVE PLACES TO BE" and trotting in the snow because stopping and refusing to walk on is not the answer, even if the snow IS deep.

Babies.

For as much as I document how naughty she can be, she has also been really fun. I haven't trotted around bareback in the snow for years and I found myself giggling and laughing as she high-stepped her way through the back paddock. She may question my authority and attempt to instill a "my way or the highway" attitude, but she always seems to come right back and get over herself.

Blazing trails in the back paddock. She was not amused.
Spud followed us to the back paddock and promptly decided "Fuck this shit".
I posted this video on my social media and had an influx of comments and private
messages about "poor Spud" and how I should be shoveling him a trail, etc.
Sigh. Little potato pony is just fine in the front where they have already
blazed a trail.... horse people sometimes.
Time off is great, but I need to strike a balance so Annie doesn't go completely feral on me. Does anyone else find Winter makes their horses revert back to their nomadic ways? lol

Back to the point of this post (and a large variety of before/after shots you all were hoping for!):



Top: Day 1
Bottom: Day 30

Top: Day 1
Bottom: Day 30
(I didn't get a conformation shot on Day 1 of the supplement, so this one is from Sept 30)
Top: Sept 30th
Bottom: Nov 17th
All in all, I'm pretty pleased with the product and the results I've achieved thus far. When we hit the 60 day mark I'll do a final update and my overall impressions, but I think there isn't much to be said other than this stuff really works. I did find that from week to week she changed a lot - sometimes her withers would look sunken in and her haunches would look filled and then it would change the next week. She also has put on a significant amount of weight, which I am really happy about - the change to straight alfalfa (minus other grains) has worked wonders.

If anyone has any questions about the product or where to get it from, feel free to drop a comment and I'll try and help you out as best as I can!

18 comments:

  1. Holy crap that's a huge change on the myoplast! I always wondered how that stuff worked.

    ReplyDelete
  2. that looks great her topline (Poor spuds in the snow and omg that is a lot of snow UGH). I am glad you and Annie came to an agreement!! :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The change has been pretty incredible!!

      Ugh, we are supposed to be getting more snow in the next two days :(

      Delete
  3. What a great change! I got some Lysine for Irish to try. If it doesn't work I will talk to my vet about the myoplast.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm pretty happy with how much she's changed!

      I hope it works for Irish :)

      Delete
  4. Her topline looks wonderful!

    I'm cracking up @ people thinking you should be out shoveling a path ahead of Spud. Horse people can really be something else!

    I think my Simon actually becomes less feral in the winter. In the summer, he can entertain his fantasies of being some sort of mustang stallion.
    In the winter he is all demure with his fluffy blanket on and when I open his stall into the paddock, will take a look outside and go, "Aaaactually I think I'm going to stay in my stall today, could I please have an extra flake of hay?" He is a bit of a prissy boy though.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you!!

      Ugh - don't get me started on horse people lol. So frustrating sometimes.

      Hhahaha. Oh, that sounds so cute!! I think my two are super bored right now with all of the snow!

      Delete
  5. you must be thrilled with that physical change! with a young and growing horse it's so important for them to have those nutritional needs met! and it always amazes me what a difference plain old groceries and some time off can do for a horse!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am very, very happy!! :)

      And yes, I am learning a ton about nutrition and feeding a young horse. It's been a learning curve lol

      Delete
  6. What a difference in Annie! And Spud in the snow - how freaken adorable!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Huge difference!!

      And yes lol, Spud was not pleased :P

      Delete
  7. I'd love more info on that product! I wonder if it would work for Ozzy. He has had a lot of muscle wasting now that he's post-EPM and retired. His weight is good but his topline definitely needs help.

    And now I have the urge to go trot around bareback in the snow <3

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If you like, you can contact me on Facebook (Cathryn Kozak) or you can email me at cathryn underscore kozak at hotmail dot com.

      And yesss! Trotting around in the snow is so fun :)

      Delete
  8. Replies
    1. Thank you, Carly!! I'm pretty happy with where she is.

      Delete